Evolving 'self'-management: exploring the role of social network typologies on individual long-term condition management.

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  • Additional Information
    • Subject Terms:
    • Author-Supplied Keywords:
      long‐term conditions
      long-term conditions
      network typologies
      qualitative
      self‐management
      self-management
      social networks
      UK
    • NAICS/Industry Codes:
      624190 Other Individual and Family Services
    • Abstract:
      Background: Whilst there has been a focus on the importance of social support for managing long‐term conditions, there has been little specific focus on the characteristics of social networks that shape self‐management. Policy emphasis is placed on individual responsibility for self‐care, and this influences commissioning of health‐care services. Assumptions are often made by policymakers about accessibility and preference for support and the influence of the social context on chronic illness management. Objective: To examine the social networks of individuals with long‐term conditions and identify how the characteristics of their composition influences support needs. Design, setting and participants: Thirty participants completed initial face‐to‐face in‐depth interviews, telephone follow‐ups and final face‐to‐face interviews in the north‐west of England. A longitudinal qualitative design was used to elicit the subtle changes in relationships over a year. Findings: The findings suggest that the relationships which constitute a social network influence perceived support needs and attitudes to self‐management. The amalgamation of relationships was characterized into three network typologies (family focused, friend focused or health‐care professional focused) according to which types of relationships were dominant. In the absence of support, accounts highlighted a small number of substitutes who could provide support at times of critical need. Discussion: This study challenges the notion of ‘self’‐management as an individual construct as many of the practices of illness management involved the support and/or negotiation of roles with others. By examining the nuances of relationships, this study has highlighted the tacit boundaries of practical and emotional support provision. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
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    • Author Affiliations:
      1Centre for Primary Care, The University of Manchester, Manchester UK
      2NIHR Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research (CLAHRC) Wessex, Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton UK
    • Full Text Word Count:
      8683
    • ISSN:
      1369-6513
    • Accession Number:
      10.1111/hex.12394
    • Accession Number:
      118174725
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      MORRIS, R. L.; KENNEDY, A.; SANDERS, C. Evolving ’self’-management: exploring the role of social network typologies on individual long-term condition management. Health Expectations, [s. l.], v. 19, n. 5, p. 1044–1061, 2016. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 18 out. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Morris RL, Kennedy A, Sanders C. Evolving ’self’-management: exploring the role of social network typologies on individual long-term condition management. Health Expectations. 2016;19(5):1044-1061. doi:10.1111/hex.12394.
    • APA:
      Morris, R. L., Kennedy, A., & Sanders, C. (2016). Evolving ’self’-management: exploring the role of social network typologies on individual long-term condition management. Health Expectations, 19(5), 1044–1061. https://doi.org/10.1111/hex.12394
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Morris, Rebecca L., Anne Kennedy, and Caroline Sanders. 2016. “Evolving ’Self’-Management: Exploring the Role of Social Network Typologies on Individual Long-Term Condition Management.” Health Expectations 19 (5): 1044–61. doi:10.1111/hex.12394.
    • Harvard:
      Morris, R. L., Kennedy, A. and Sanders, C. (2016) ‘Evolving ’self’-management: exploring the role of social network typologies on individual long-term condition management’, Health Expectations, 19(5), pp. 1044–1061. doi: 10.1111/hex.12394.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Morris, RL, Kennedy, A & Sanders, C 2016, ‘Evolving ’self’-management: exploring the role of social network typologies on individual long-term condition management’, Health Expectations, vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 1044–1061, viewed 18 October 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Morris, Rebecca L., et al. “Evolving ’Self’-Management: Exploring the Role of Social Network Typologies on Individual Long-Term Condition Management.” Health Expectations, vol. 19, no. 5, Oct. 2016, pp. 1044–1061. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1111/hex.12394.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Morris, Rebecca L., Anne Kennedy, and Caroline Sanders. “Evolving ’Self’-Management: Exploring the Role of Social Network Typologies on Individual Long-Term Condition Management.” Health Expectations 19, no. 5 (October 2016): 1044–61. doi:10.1111/hex.12394.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Morris RL, Kennedy A, Sanders C. Evolving ’self’-management: exploring the role of social network typologies on individual long-term condition management. Health Expectations [Internet]. 2016 Oct [cited 2019 Oct 18];19(5):1044–61. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=118174725&custid=s8280428