Listening to self-chosen music regulates induced negative affect for both younger and older adults.

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  • Additional Information
    • Author-Supplied Keywords:
      Age groups
      Biology and life sciences
      Cognitive psychology
      Cognitive science
      Depression
      Elderly
      Emotions
      Mathematical and statistical techniques
      Mathematics
      Medicine and health sciences
      Mental health and psychiatry
      Mood disorders
      Music cognition
      Music perception
      Neuroscience
      People and places
      Physical sciences
      Population groupings
      Psychological stress
      Psychology
      Regression analysis
      Research and analysis methods
      Research Article
      Sensory perception
      Social sciences
      Statistical methods
      Statistics
    • Abstract:
      The current study evaluated the efficacy of self-chosen music listening for the function of affect regulation comparing effects in younger and older adults. Forty younger (18–30 years, M = 19.75, SD = 2.57, 14 males) and forty older (60–81 years, M = 68.48, SD = 6.07, 21 males) adults visited the laboratory and were randomised to either the intervention (10 minutes of listening to self-chosen music) or the active control condition (10 minutes of listening to an experimenter-chosen radio documentary). Negative affect (NA) was induced in all participants using a speech preparation and mental arithmetic task, followed by the intervention/control condition. Measures of self-reported affect were taken at baseline, post-induction and post-intervention. Controlling for baseline affect and reactivity to the NA induction, in comparison with the active control group the music listening group demonstrated greater reduction in NA. Supporting developmental theories of positive ageing, analyses also found significant main effects for age, with older adults experiencing greater reduction of NA than younger adults, regardless of condition. Results of the current study provide preliminary insights into the effects of self-chosen music on induced NA, however, additional experimental control conditions comparing self-chosen and experimenter-chosen music with self-chosen and experimenter-chosen active controls are needed to fully understand music listening effects for affect regulation. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
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    • Author Affiliations:
      1School of Psychology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom
      2School of Psychology, National University of Ireland, Galway, Galway, Ireland
    • Full Text Word Count:
      10645
    • ISSN:
      1932-6203
    • Accession Number:
      10.1371/journal.pone.0218017
    • Accession Number:
      136835870
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      GROARKE, J. M.; HOGAN, M. J. Listening to self-chosen music regulates induced negative affect for both younger and older adults. PLoS ONE, [s. l.], v. 14, n. 6, p. 1–19, 2019. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 21 ago. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Groarke JM, Hogan MJ. Listening to self-chosen music regulates induced negative affect for both younger and older adults. PLoS ONE. 2019;14(6):1-19. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0218017.
    • APA:
      Groarke, J. M., & Hogan, M. J. (2019). Listening to self-chosen music regulates induced negative affect for both younger and older adults. PLoS ONE, 14(6), 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0218017
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Groarke, Jenny M., and Michael J. Hogan. 2019. “Listening to Self-Chosen Music Regulates Induced Negative Affect for Both Younger and Older Adults.” PLoS ONE 14 (6): 1–19. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0218017.
    • Harvard:
      Groarke, J. M. and Hogan, M. J. (2019) ‘Listening to self-chosen music regulates induced negative affect for both younger and older adults’, PLoS ONE, 14(6), pp. 1–19. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0218017.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Groarke, JM & Hogan, MJ 2019, ‘Listening to self-chosen music regulates induced negative affect for both younger and older adults’, PLoS ONE, vol. 14, no. 6, pp. 1–19, viewed 21 August 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Groarke, Jenny M., and Michael J. Hogan. “Listening to Self-Chosen Music Regulates Induced Negative Affect for Both Younger and Older Adults.” PLoS ONE, vol. 14, no. 6, June 2019, pp. 1–19. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0218017.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Groarke, Jenny M., and Michael J. Hogan. “Listening to Self-Chosen Music Regulates Induced Negative Affect for Both Younger and Older Adults.” PLoS ONE 14, no. 6 (June 6, 2019): 1–19. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0218017.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Groarke JM, Hogan MJ. Listening to self-chosen music regulates induced negative affect for both younger and older adults. PLoS ONE [Internet]. 2019 Jun 6 [cited 2019 Aug 21];14(6):1–19. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=136835870&custid=s8280428