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Old Chicago and New France.

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  • Additional Information
    • Subject Terms:
    • NAICS/Industry Codes:
      541720 Research and Development in the Social Sciences and Humanities
    • Abstract:
      This article describes the contemporary appeal of the Chicago sociology perspective in France, and analyzes the bases of its attraction. Old Chicago sociology/anthropology was a heady and fruitful conjoining of ethnography, urban ecology and geography, interactionist social psychology, and pragmatist epistemology. Using the vocabulary of science, it spoke of the city of Chicago as its laboratory, but what this meant was that its students were exhorted to exit the library in order to roam, observe, and undertake what then were termed case studies and today, urban ethnography. The laboratory was particularly exciting because of the growth in the population in Chicago, Illinois. Immigrants had been flooding the U.S. and its urban centers throughout the late 19th and early 20th century, and Chicago was a nodal point. Within Europe of the period there had also been migrations on a lesser yet also significant scale, especially from the east to the west. In France, Europe, an throughout the world, an intense process of urbanization has been occurring. The challenge has been how to understand and describe the processes and their consequences, other than being publicly appalled. Jammed side by side in these immense cities are clusters and communities of families and peoples differing in languages, religions, ethnic-cultural origins, and social race.
    • Full Text Word Count:
      9475
    • ISSN:
      0003-1232
    • Accession Number:
      10.1007/s12108-000-1011-2
    • Accession Number:
      4353354
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      WAX, M. L. Old Chicago and New France. American Sociologist, [s. l.], v. 31, n. 4, p. 65–82, 2000. DOI 10.1007/s12108-000-1011-2. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=4353354&custid=s8280428. Acesso em: 7 jul. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Wax ML. Old Chicago and New France. American Sociologist. 2000;31(4):65-82. doi:10.1007/s12108-000-1011-2.
    • AMA11:
      Wax ML. Old Chicago and New France. American Sociologist. 2000;31(4):65-82. doi:10.1007/s12108-000-1011-2
    • APA:
      Wax, M. L. (2000). Old Chicago and New France. American Sociologist, 31(4), 65–82. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12108-000-1011-2
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Wax, Murray L. 2000. “Old Chicago and New France.” American Sociologist 31 (4): 65–82. doi:10.1007/s12108-000-1011-2.
    • Harvard:
      Wax, M. L. (2000) ‘Old Chicago and New France’, American Sociologist, 31(4), pp. 65–82. doi: 10.1007/s12108-000-1011-2.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Wax, ML 2000, ‘Old Chicago and New France’, American Sociologist, vol. 31, no. 4, pp. 65–82, viewed 7 July 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Wax, Murray L. “Old Chicago and New France.” American Sociologist, vol. 31, no. 4, Winter 2000, pp. 65–82. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1007/s12108-000-1011-2.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Wax, Murray L. “Old Chicago and New France.” American Sociologist 31, no. 4 (Winter 2000): 65–82. doi:10.1007/s12108-000-1011-2.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Wax ML. Old Chicago and New France. American Sociologist [Internet]. 2000 Winter [cited 2020 Jul 7];31(4):65–82. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=4353354&custid=s8280428