Kidnapping Politics in East Asia.

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  • Additional Information
    • Subject Terms:
    • Author-Supplied Keywords:
      abduction
      captivity
      civil society
      institutional performance
      Japanese foreign policy
      kidnapping
      media capture
      political leadership
      South Korean foreign policy
      sovereignty
    • NAICS/Industry Codes:
      911410 Foreign affairs
      928120 International Affairs
    • Abstract:
      In this article, I examine two contemporary cases in which the same foreign adversary, North Korea (DPRK), violated the sovereignty of neighboring states. I use a comparison of South Korean and Japanese reactions to political captivity to assess institutional performance in democratic states and ways in which these dynamics are connected to international politics. We see how "captivity narratives" can be differentially constructed and deployed and how policy capture can be achieved by determined political actors. Civic groups in both countries worked to mobilize political support, frame the issue for the media, and force policy change. In Japan, politicians were more willing to use the abduction issue for domestic political gain than in Korea, where the political class was determined to prevent human rights issues (including abductions) from interfering with their larger political agenda, including improved relations with the DPRK. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of Journal of East Asian Studies is the property of Cambridge University Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
    • Author Affiliations:
      1Center for International Studies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    • ISSN:
      1598-2408
    • Accession Number:
      10.1017/S1598240800003660
    • Accession Number:
      55783270
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      SAMUELS, R. J. Kidnapping Politics in East Asia. Journal of East Asian Studies, [s. l.], v. 10, n. 3, p. 363–395, 2010. DOI 10.1017/S1598240800003660. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=55783270&custid=s8280428. Acesso em: 9 dez. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Samuels RJ. Kidnapping Politics in East Asia. Journal of East Asian Studies. 2010;10(3):363-395. doi:10.1017/S1598240800003660.
    • APA:
      Samuels, R. J. (2010). Kidnapping Politics in East Asia. Journal of East Asian Studies, 10(3), 363–395. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1598240800003660
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Samuels, Richard J. 2010. “Kidnapping Politics in East Asia.” Journal of East Asian Studies 10 (3): 363–95. doi:10.1017/S1598240800003660.
    • Harvard:
      Samuels, R. J. (2010) ‘Kidnapping Politics in East Asia’, Journal of East Asian Studies, 10(3), pp. 363–395. doi: 10.1017/S1598240800003660.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Samuels, RJ 2010, ‘Kidnapping Politics in East Asia’, Journal of East Asian Studies, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 363–395, viewed 9 December 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Samuels, Richard J. “Kidnapping Politics in East Asia.” Journal of East Asian Studies, vol. 10, no. 3, Sept. 2010, pp. 363–395. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1017/S1598240800003660.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Samuels, Richard J. “Kidnapping Politics in East Asia.” Journal of East Asian Studies 10, no. 3 (September 2010): 363–95. doi:10.1017/S1598240800003660.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Samuels RJ. Kidnapping Politics in East Asia. Journal of East Asian Studies [Internet]. 2010 Sep [cited 2019 Dec 9];10(3):363–95. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=55783270&custid=s8280428