Understanding Affirmative Action.

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  • Additional Information
    • NAICS/Industry Codes:
      923130 Administration of Human Resource Programs (except Education, Public Health, and Veterans' Affairs Programs)
      541612 Human Resources Consulting Services
      541720 Research and Development in the Social Sciences and Humanities
    • Abstract:
      The purpose of this article is to lay a conceptual groundwork that is needed if social scientists and policy makers are to design and implement fair and effective affirmative action programs. Because affirmative action is not well understood, in or out of the academy, the article starts with definitions, both general and technical, contrasts affirmative action with equal opportunity, and touches on the distinction between policy and practice. I then argue that affirmative action is a necessary policy, that it can be effective, and that it is fair. But the policy is for three other reasons: (a) it focuses on deficiencies, (b) it disturbs expectations, and (c) it poses a threat to individualism, interfering with self-congratulations. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of Basic & Applied Social Psychology is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
    • Author Affiliations:
      1J. L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management Northwestern University
    • ISSN:
      0197-3533
    • Accession Number:
      10.1080/01973533.1994.9646071
    • Accession Number:
      7300911
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      CROSBY, F. J. Understanding Affirmative Action. Basic & Applied Social Psychology, [s. l.], v. 15, n. 1/2, p. 13–41, 1994. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 21 ago. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Crosby FJ. Understanding Affirmative Action. Basic & Applied Social Psychology. 1994;15(1/2):13-41. doi:10.1080/01973533.1994.9646071.
    • APA:
      Crosby, F. J. (1994). Understanding Affirmative Action. Basic & Applied Social Psychology, 15(1/2), 13–41. https://doi.org/10.1080/01973533.1994.9646071
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Crosby, Faye J. 1994. “Understanding Affirmative Action.” Basic & Applied Social Psychology 15 (1/2): 13–41. doi:10.1080/01973533.1994.9646071.
    • Harvard:
      Crosby, F. J. (1994) ‘Understanding Affirmative Action’, Basic & Applied Social Psychology, 15(1/2), pp. 13–41. doi: 10.1080/01973533.1994.9646071.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Crosby, FJ 1994, ‘Understanding Affirmative Action’, Basic & Applied Social Psychology, vol. 15, no. 1/2, pp. 13–41, viewed 21 August 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Crosby, Faye J. “Understanding Affirmative Action.” Basic & Applied Social Psychology, vol. 15, no. 1/2, Apr. 1994, pp. 13–41. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1080/01973533.1994.9646071.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Crosby, Faye J. “Understanding Affirmative Action.” Basic & Applied Social Psychology 15, no. 1/2 (April 1994): 13–41. doi:10.1080/01973533.1994.9646071.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Crosby FJ. Understanding Affirmative Action. Basic & Applied Social Psychology [Internet]. 1994 Apr [cited 2019 Aug 21];15(1/2):13–41. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=7300911&custid=s8280428