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Regions With Higher Medicare Part D Spending Show Better Drug Adherence, But Not Lower Medicare Costs For Two Diseases.

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  • Additional Information
    • Subject Terms:
    • NAICS/Industry Codes:
      325410 Pharmaceutical and medicine manufacturing
      424210 Drugs and Druggists' Sundries Merchant Wholesalers
      414510 Pharmaceuticals and pharmacy supplies merchant wholesalers
      923130 Administration of Human Resource Programs (except Education, Public Health, and Veterans' Affairs Programs)
      541910 Marketing Research and Public Opinion Polling
    • Abstract:
      A quarter-century of research on geographic variation in Medicare costs has failed to find any positive association between high spending and better health outcomes. We conducted this study using a 5 percent random sample of Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes or heart failure in 2006 and 2007 to see whether there was any correlation between geographic variation in Part D spending and good medication- taking behavior-and, if so, whether that correlation resulted in reduced Medicare Parts A and B spending on diabetes and heart failure treatments. We found that beneficiaries residing in areas characterized by higher adjusted drug spending had significantly more "therapy days"- days with recommended medications on hand-than did beneficiaries in lower-spending areas. However, we did not find that this factor translated into short-term savings in Medicare treatment costs for these two diseases. This result might not be surprising, since returns from medication adherence can take years to manifest. At the same time, discovering which regional factors are responsible for differences in drug spending and medication practices should be a high priority. If the observed differences are related to poor physician communication or lack of good care coordination, then appropriately designed policy tools- including accountable care organizations, medical homes, and provider quality reporting initiatives-might help address them. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of Health Affairs is the property of Project HOPE/HEALTH AFFAIRS and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
    • Author Affiliations:
      1Parke-Davis Chair in Geriatric Pharmacotherapy Dept. of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, Baltimore
      2Director of Policy & Research, Pharmaceutical Research & Manufacturers of America, Washington, D.C.
      3Doctoral Student in Gerontology, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD
      4Senior Economist, Center for Financing, Access & Cost Trends, Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality, Rockville, MD
    • ISSN:
      0278-2715
    • Accession Number:
      10.1377/hlthaff.2011.0727
    • Accession Number:
      84952086
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      STUART, B. et al. Regions With Higher Medicare Part D Spending Show Better Drug Adherence, But Not Lower Medicare Costs For Two Diseases. Health Affairs, [s. l.], v. 32, n. 1, p. 120–126, 2013. DOI 10.1377/hlthaff.2011.0727. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=84952086&custid=s8280428. Acesso em: 7 ago. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Stuart B, Shoemaker JS, Dai M, Davidoff AJ. Regions With Higher Medicare Part D Spending Show Better Drug Adherence, But Not Lower Medicare Costs For Two Diseases. Health Affairs. 2013;32(1):120-126. doi:10.1377/hlthaff.2011.0727
    • APA:
      Stuart, B., Shoemaker, J. S., Dai, M., & Davidoff, A. J. (2013). Regions With Higher Medicare Part D Spending Show Better Drug Adherence, But Not Lower Medicare Costs For Two Diseases. Health Affairs, 32(1), 120–126. https://doi.org/10.1377/hlthaff.2011.0727
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Stuart, Bruce, J. Samantha Shoemaker, Mingliang Dai, and Amy J. Davidoff. 2013. “Regions With Higher Medicare Part D Spending Show Better Drug Adherence, But Not Lower Medicare Costs For Two Diseases.” Health Affairs 32 (1): 120–26. doi:10.1377/hlthaff.2011.0727.
    • Harvard:
      Stuart, B. et al. (2013) ‘Regions With Higher Medicare Part D Spending Show Better Drug Adherence, But Not Lower Medicare Costs For Two Diseases’, Health Affairs, 32(1), pp. 120–126. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2011.0727.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Stuart, B, Shoemaker, JS, Dai, M & Davidoff, AJ 2013, ‘Regions With Higher Medicare Part D Spending Show Better Drug Adherence, But Not Lower Medicare Costs For Two Diseases’, Health Affairs, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 120–126, viewed 7 August 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Stuart, Bruce, et al. “Regions With Higher Medicare Part D Spending Show Better Drug Adherence, But Not Lower Medicare Costs For Two Diseases.” Health Affairs, vol. 32, no. 1, Jan. 2013, pp. 120–126. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1377/hlthaff.2011.0727.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Stuart, Bruce, J. Samantha Shoemaker, Mingliang Dai, and Amy J. Davidoff. “Regions With Higher Medicare Part D Spending Show Better Drug Adherence, But Not Lower Medicare Costs For Two Diseases.” Health Affairs 32, no. 1 (January 2013): 120–26. doi:10.1377/hlthaff.2011.0727.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Stuart B, Shoemaker JS, Dai M, Davidoff AJ. Regions With Higher Medicare Part D Spending Show Better Drug Adherence, But Not Lower Medicare Costs For Two Diseases. Health Affairs [Internet]. 2013 Jan [cited 2020 Aug 7];32(1):120–6. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=84952086&custid=s8280428