Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading  Processing Request

Problem-based learning (PBL): Getting the most out of your students - Their roles and responsibilities: AMEE Guide No. 84.

Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading   Processing Request
  • Additional Information
    • Abstract:
      This Guide discusses the considerable literature on the merits or shortcomings of Problem-based learning (PBL), and the factors that promote or inhibit it, when seen through the eyes of the student. It seems to be the case that PBL works best when students and faculty understand the various factors that influence learning and are aware of their roles; this Guide deals with each of the main issues in turn. One of the most important concepts to recognise is that students and Faculty share the responsibility for learning and there are several factors that can influence its success. They include student motivation for PBL and the various ways in which they respond to being immersed in the process. As faculty, we also need to consider the way in which the learning environment supports the students develop the habit of life-long learning, and the skills and attitudes that will help them become competent reflective practitioners. Each of these elements place responsibilities upon the student, but also upon the Faculty and learning community they are joining. Although all of the authors work in a European setting, where PBL is used extensively as a learning strategy in many medical schools, the lessons learned we suggest, apply more widely, and several of the important factors apply to any form of curriculum. This Guide follows on from a previous review in the AMEE Guides in Medical education series, which provided an overview of PBL and attempts to emphasise the key role that students have in mastering their subject through PBL. This should render the business of being a student a little less mystifying, and help faculty to see how they can help their students acquire the independence and mastery that they will need. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of Medical Teacher is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
    • Author Affiliations:
      1The University of Liverpool, UK
      2EMILY BATE, MSc., MB ChB, is an Academic Education Foundation doctor at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital and Co-chair of the Junior Association for the Study of Medication Education committee. Her research interests are in student involvement in medical education and PBL.
      3Maastricht University, The Netherlands
      4JULIETTE HOMMES, MD, is currently working as a resident in plastic and reconstructive surgery, and a PhD student focussed on effective collaboration in medical education. Main interests are social networks, group processes, problem-based learning and cohort studies.
      5ROBBERT DUVIVIER is a medical doctor with a PhD in Medical Education from Maastricht University. He is affiliated with the Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research (FAIMER) as a researcher and works in acute psychiatry in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
      6DAVID C. M. TAYLOR, BSc, MEd, MA, PhD, is the Reader in Medical Education at Liverpool University School of Medicine. Trained as a neurophysiologist, David now works exclusively in medical education. He is very involved in curriculum development, reform and validation both in the UK and overseas. David's research interests are in problem-based learning, professionalism, pastoral care and adult learning theories.
    • Full Text Word Count:
      11667
    • ISSN:
      0142-159X
    • Accession Number:
      10.3109/0142159X.2014.848269
    • Accession Number:
      92999248
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      BATE, E. et al. Problem-based learning (PBL): Getting the most out of your students - Their roles and responsibilities: AMEE Guide No. 84. Medical Teacher, [s. l.], v. 36, n. 1, p. 1–12, 2014. DOI 10.3109/0142159X.2014.848269. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=92999248&custid=s8280428. Acesso em: 5 jul. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Bate E, Hommes J, Duvivier R, Taylor DCM. Problem-based learning (PBL): Getting the most out of your students - Their roles and responsibilities: AMEE Guide No. 84. Medical Teacher. 2014;36(1):1-12. doi:10.3109/0142159X.2014.848269.
    • AMA11:
      Bate E, Hommes J, Duvivier R, Taylor DCM. Problem-based learning (PBL): Getting the most out of your students - Their roles and responsibilities: AMEE Guide No. 84. Medical Teacher. 2014;36(1):1-12. doi:10.3109/0142159X.2014.848269
    • APA:
      Bate, E., Hommes, J., Duvivier, R., & Taylor, D. C. M. (2014). Problem-based learning (PBL): Getting the most out of your students - Their roles and responsibilities: AMEE Guide No. 84. Medical Teacher, 36(1), 1–12. https://doi.org/10.3109/0142159X.2014.848269
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Bate, Emily, Juliette Hommes, Robbert Duvivier, and David C. M. Taylor. 2014. “Problem-Based Learning (PBL): Getting the Most out of Your Students - Their Roles and Responsibilities: AMEE Guide No. 84.” Medical Teacher 36 (1): 1–12. doi:10.3109/0142159X.2014.848269.
    • Harvard:
      Bate, E. et al. (2014) ‘Problem-based learning (PBL): Getting the most out of your students - Their roles and responsibilities: AMEE Guide No. 84’, Medical Teacher, 36(1), pp. 1–12. doi: 10.3109/0142159X.2014.848269.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Bate, E, Hommes, J, Duvivier, R & Taylor, DCM 2014, ‘Problem-based learning (PBL): Getting the most out of your students - Their roles and responsibilities: AMEE Guide No. 84’, Medical Teacher, vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 1–12, viewed 5 July 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Bate, Emily, et al. “Problem-Based Learning (PBL): Getting the Most out of Your Students - Their Roles and Responsibilities: AMEE Guide No. 84.” Medical Teacher, vol. 36, no. 1, Jan. 2014, pp. 1–12. EBSCOhost, doi:10.3109/0142159X.2014.848269.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Bate, Emily, Juliette Hommes, Robbert Duvivier, and David C. M. Taylor. “Problem-Based Learning (PBL): Getting the Most out of Your Students - Their Roles and Responsibilities: AMEE Guide No. 84.” Medical Teacher 36, no. 1 (January 2014): 1–12. doi:10.3109/0142159X.2014.848269.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Bate E, Hommes J, Duvivier R, Taylor DCM. Problem-based learning (PBL): Getting the most out of your students - Their roles and responsibilities: AMEE Guide No. 84. Medical Teacher [Internet]. 2014 Jan [cited 2020 Jul 5];36(1):1–12. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=92999248&custid=s8280428