Metropolitan Accessibility and Socioeconomic Differentiation in Nonmetropolitan Areas

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      University of North Carolina Press, 1978.
    • Publication Date:
      1978
    • Abstract:
      This paper addresses the ecological problem of how a territorial system is organized around a metropolitan center or system of such centers. We hypothesize that accessibility to the metropolitan system is inversely related to the degree of internal heterogeneity or differentiation of nonmetropolitan cities. Measuring differentiation on four variables: industry, occupation, education, and income, we find general support for this proposition. Ecological theory bearing on these problems also suggests that such specialization derives from trade interdependencies that grow with increased accessibility to the total territorial system. We interpret this to mean that the degree of industrial differentiation in a community mediates the relation between accessibility and other dimensions of differentiation. Again, the evidence seems to support this prediction.
    • ISSN:
      00377732
      15347605
    • Accession Number:
      10.2307/2577691
    • Rights:
      Copyright 1978 Social Forces
    • Accession Number:
      edsjsr.10.2307.2577691
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      JAMES R. LINCOLN; ROGER FRIEDLAND. Metropolitan Accessibility and Socioeconomic Differentiation in Nonmetropolitan Areas. Social Forces, [s. l.], v. 57, n. 2, p. 688, 1978. DOI 10.2307/2577691. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsjsr&AN=edsjsr.10.2307.2577691&custid=s8280428. Acesso em: 15 dez. 2019.
    • AMA:
      James R. Lincoln, Roger Friedland. Metropolitan Accessibility and Socioeconomic Differentiation in Nonmetropolitan Areas. Social Forces. 1978;57(2):688. doi:10.2307/2577691.
    • APA:
      James R. Lincoln, & Roger Friedland. (1978). Metropolitan Accessibility and Socioeconomic Differentiation in Nonmetropolitan Areas. Social Forces, 57(2), 688. https://doi.org/10.2307/2577691
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      James R. Lincoln, and Roger Friedland. 1978. “Metropolitan Accessibility and Socioeconomic Differentiation in Nonmetropolitan Areas.” Social Forces 57 (2): 688. doi:10.2307/2577691.
    • Harvard:
      James R. Lincoln and Roger Friedland (1978) ‘Metropolitan Accessibility and Socioeconomic Differentiation in Nonmetropolitan Areas’, Social Forces, 57(2), p. 688. doi: 10.2307/2577691.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      James R. Lincoln & Roger Friedland 1978, ‘Metropolitan Accessibility and Socioeconomic Differentiation in Nonmetropolitan Areas’, Social Forces, vol. 57, no. 2, p. 688, viewed 15 December 2019, .
    • MLA:
      James R. Lincoln, and Roger Friedland. “Metropolitan Accessibility and Socioeconomic Differentiation in Nonmetropolitan Areas.” Social Forces, vol. 57, no. 2, 1978, p. 688. EBSCOhost, doi:10.2307/2577691.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      James R. Lincoln, and Roger Friedland. “Metropolitan Accessibility and Socioeconomic Differentiation in Nonmetropolitan Areas.” Social Forces 57, no. 2 (1978): 688. doi:10.2307/2577691.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      James R. Lincoln, Roger Friedland. Metropolitan Accessibility and Socioeconomic Differentiation in Nonmetropolitan Areas. Social Forces [Internet]. 1978 [cited 2019 Dec 15];57(2):688. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsjsr&AN=edsjsr.10.2307.2577691&custid=s8280428