FOR THE SAKE OF THE CHILDREN: COLLABORATIONS BETWEEN LAW AND SOCIAL SCIENCE TO ADVANCE THE FIELD OF FAMILY DISPUTE RESOLUTION: INTERDISCIPLINARY LAW AND PSYCHOLOGY TRAINING AT INDIANA UNIVERSITY

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  • Source:
    Family Court Review, 2009/07/01, Vol: 47, p485
  • Additional Information
    • Author:
      Robin Ballard and Mary Nyman
    • Abstract:
      1. WHAT WERE YOU HOPING TO GET OUT OF YOUR GRADUATE EDUCATION? WHAT WERE YOUR EXPECTATIONS? M.N.: I chose to apply for law school because I wanted a career in a respected and challenging profession that would provide both stability and a wide range of opportunities. In addition, I wanted to enter a service profession where I could use my education to help people in my community. Upon entering law school, I was hoping to learn how to work with clients and respond to their individual legal needs. My law school summer work with a non-profit guardian ad litem office and a law firm with a family law practice area helped me decide to pursue a career in family law. I wanted to practice in a situation where I would have a personal connection to individual clients. Throughout my legal education, I took advantage of every family law opportunity available, including working at the Mediation Clinic and enrolling in a psychology graduate seminar on the effects of divorce on families and children. I believe I have obtained a well-rounded education that has prepared me for my career as a family law attorney. R.B.: I was initially attracted to a graduate education in clinical psychology because the degree offers a combination of rigorous research experience and interactions with real people and problems. Research and the clinical work reinforce each other: clinical experience inspires research questions and research informs clinical practice. I have a longstanding interest in women's issues and ...
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