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Dewey vs Genre Throwdown

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  • Source:
    Knowledge Quest, v42 n2 p48-55 Nov-Dec 2013. 8 pp.
  • Accession Number:
    http://www.ala.org/aasl/kq/v42no2
  • Language:
    English
  • Publication Type:
    Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
  • Additional Information
    • Author(s):
    • Availability:
      American Association of School Librarians. Available from: American Library Association. 50 East Huron Street, Chicago, IL 60611. Tel: 1-800-545-2433; Web site: http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/aasl/aaslpubsandjournals/knowledgequest/knowledgequest.cfm
    • Peer Reviewed:
      Y
    • ISSN:
      1094-9046
    • Subject Terms:
    • Subject Terms:
    • Keyword:
      Colorado
    • Abstract:
      In this article St. Vrain Valley (CO) School District (SVVSD) librarian, Holli Buchter describes what took place in the school libraries in the district when the newest elementary school, Red Hawk, opened its doors. Red Hawk asked and answered the question: "Is the Dewey Decimal Classification system still the best way for students to locate the information they seek?" The Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) system has been in use since 1876. The majority of school libraries use it, and, until recently, school librarians have not questioned its validity and purposeful use in a public school library setting. SVVSD "did" question its use and took a chance to make a difference in the lives of students; the results were astounding. Red Hawk Elementary worked to create a new classification system that would address curriculum needs and categories that would guide students and staff to be independent searchers and users of information. The pilot at Red Hawk was the first of its kind in a public elementary school library to convert an entire library and have the catalog reflect the conversion. The system was immediately embraced by students, staff, parents, and district administrators. Some of the features include: (1) Separate sections for graphic novels and ready-to-read (beginning chapter books); (2) Clear delineation between fiction and nonfiction titles; (3) Fiction books organized by genre; (4) Nonfiction books organized by subject; and (5) A unique ten-page cataloging grid instead of DDC's four volumes needed to catalog. Other schools within the district would like to use this model of library organization. The conversion process, while time-consuming, does strengthen school librarians' collection-development skills and their knowledge of genre characteristics. As a result, the librarians are better able to do readers' advisory with their school population. The conversion process has proven to be more effective than any other professional development opportunity in the past. Red Hawk was the prototype for this innovation and was the incentive for other schools in SVVSD to evaluate their reasons for continuing use of DDC.
    • Abstract:
      ERIC
    • Number of References:
      2
    • Physical Description:
      8
    • Education Level:
      Elementary Education
    • Journal Code:
      APR2018
    • Publication Date:
      2014
    • Accession Number:
      EJ1040241
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      BUCHTER, H. Dewey vs Genre Throwdown. Knowledge Quest, [s. l.], v. 42, n. 2, p. 48–55, 2013. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=eric&AN=EJ1040241&custid=s8280428. Acesso em: 14 jul. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Buchter H. Dewey vs Genre Throwdown. Knowledge Quest. 2013;42(2):48-55. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=eric&AN=EJ1040241&custid=s8280428. Accessed July 14, 2020.
    • AMA11:
      Buchter H. Dewey vs Genre Throwdown. Knowledge Quest. 2013;42(2):48-55. Accessed July 14, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=eric&AN=EJ1040241&custid=s8280428
    • APA:
      Buchter, H. (2013). Dewey vs Genre Throwdown. Knowledge Quest, 42(2), 48–55.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Buchter, Holli. 2013. “Dewey vs Genre Throwdown.” Knowledge Quest 42 (2): 48–55. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=eric&AN=EJ1040241&custid=s8280428.
    • Harvard:
      Buchter, H. (2013) ‘Dewey vs Genre Throwdown’, Knowledge Quest, 42(2), pp. 48–55. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=eric&AN=EJ1040241&custid=s8280428 (Accessed: 14 July 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Buchter, H 2013, ‘Dewey vs Genre Throwdown’, Knowledge Quest, vol. 42, no. 2, pp. 48–55, viewed 14 July 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Buchter, Holli. “Dewey vs Genre Throwdown.” Knowledge Quest, vol. 42, no. 2, Jan. 2013, pp. 48–55. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=eric&AN=EJ1040241&custid=s8280428.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Buchter, Holli. “Dewey vs Genre Throwdown.” Knowledge Quest 42, no. 2 (January 1, 2013): 48–55. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=eric&AN=EJ1040241&custid=s8280428.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Buchter H. Dewey vs Genre Throwdown. Knowledge Quest [Internet]. 2013 Jan 1 [cited 2020 Jul 14];42(2):48–55. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=eric&AN=EJ1040241&custid=s8280428