Prestige, Status, and Esteem and the Teacher Shortage

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  • Source:
    Journal of Education and Learning, v8 n4 p185-213 2019. 29 pp.
  • Language:
    English
  • Publication Type:
    Journal Articles; Reports - Research
  • Additional Information
    • Author(s):
    • Availability:
      Full Text from ERIC Available online: https://eric.ed.gov/contentdelivery/servlet/ERICServlet?accno=EJ1222615
      Canadian Center of Science and Education. 1120 Finch Avenue West Suite 701-309, Toronto, OH M3J 3H7, Canada. Tel: 416-642-2606; Fax: 416-642-2608; e-mail: jel@ccsenet.org; Web site: http://www.ccsenet.org/journal/index.php/jel
    • Peer Reviewed:
      Y
    • ISSN:
      1927-5250
    • Subject Terms:
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      1,127 U.S. high school senior and college undergraduate perceptions of teaching's prestige, status, and esteem were explored in this study. The population consisted of 302 high school seniors and 825 college undergraduates from the Midwestern region of the United States. The study included 51 statements where participants rated their perceptions of teaching's prestige, status, and esteem on an 8-point Likert scale. The data was factor analyzed, and the results identified that the perceptions of teaching's prestige consisted of financial and image perceptions. A descriptive analysis found that U.S. high school senior and college undergraduate perceptions of teaching's financial component of prestige (M = 9.99, SD = 2.90) and esteem (M = 10.42, SD = 3.05) were more negative in comparison to status (M = 13.38, SD = 2.74). Bivariate correlation, Univariate, and hierarchical linear regression techniques measured the effects that the perceptions of teaching's prestige, status, and esteem had on U.S. high school seniors and college undergraduate teaching considerations. The results indicated that the perceptions of teaching's status may encourage U.S. high school seniors and college undergraduates to consider careers in teaching, but the perceptions of esteem may produce opposite effects. The results demonstrated that the perceptions of teaching's esteem may discourage U.S. high school seniors and college undergraduates scoring in the upper deciles of the ACT (American College Testing) from considering teaching in the United States. The results indicated that the perceptions of esteem may also discourage U.S. urban female high school seniors and college undergraduates from considering the career. Finally, the results demonstrated the perceptions of teaching's esteem and its interaction with the financial perceptions of teaching's prestige may discourage U.S. aspiring teachers from the career. This result raises questions as to the "roots" of the early teacher attrition problem in the United States.
    • Abstract:
      As Provided
    • Number of References:
      -1
    • Physical Description:
      29
    • Education Level:
      High Schools; Secondary Education; Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
    • Journal Code:
      SEP2019
    • Publication Date:
      2019
    • Accession Number:
      EJ1222615
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      KLIMEK, S. G. Prestige, Status, and Esteem and the Teacher Shortage. Journal of Education and Learning, [s. l.], v. 8, n. 4, p. 185–213, 2019. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 19 nov. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Klimek SG. Prestige, Status, and Esteem and the Teacher Shortage. Journal of Education and Learning. 2019;8(4):185-213. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=eric&AN=EJ1222615&custid=s8280428. Accessed November 19, 2019.
    • APA:
      Klimek, S. G. (2019). Prestige, Status, and Esteem and the Teacher Shortage. Journal of Education and Learning, 8(4), 185–213. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=eric&AN=EJ1222615&custid=s8280428
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Klimek, Scott G. 2019. “Prestige, Status, and Esteem and the Teacher Shortage.” Journal of Education and Learning 8 (4): 185–213. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=eric&AN=EJ1222615&custid=s8280428.
    • Harvard:
      Klimek, S. G. (2019) ‘Prestige, Status, and Esteem and the Teacher Shortage’, Journal of Education and Learning, 8(4), pp. 185–213. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=eric&AN=EJ1222615&custid=s8280428 (Accessed: 19 November 2019).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Klimek, SG 2019, ‘Prestige, Status, and Esteem and the Teacher Shortage’, Journal of Education and Learning, vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 185–213, viewed 19 November 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Klimek, Scott G. “Prestige, Status, and Esteem and the Teacher Shortage.” Journal of Education and Learning, vol. 8, no. 4, Jan. 2019, pp. 185–213. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=eric&AN=EJ1222615&custid=s8280428.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Klimek, Scott G. “Prestige, Status, and Esteem and the Teacher Shortage.” Journal of Education and Learning 8, no. 4 (January 1, 2019): 185–213. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=eric&AN=EJ1222615&custid=s8280428.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Klimek SG. Prestige, Status, and Esteem and the Teacher Shortage. Journal of Education and Learning [Internet]. 2019 Jan 1 [cited 2019 Nov 19];8(4):185–213. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=eric&AN=EJ1222615&custid=s8280428